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Plants for Winter Interest & Holiday Decorating

Wouldn’t you love to have an abundance of fresh holiday greens, brilliant berries and colorful twigs at your fingertips at the beginning of the winter holidays each and every year? Endless fodder for wreath making, mantle decorating, garland enhancing and container filling can be yours for the taking if you plan now and plant come spring.

Top picks include…

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You may not be able to add every type of winter interest plant to your landscaping, but just a few select options will give you plenty of raw material to work with no matter what natural decorations you would like to craft. To make the most of these options…

  • Choose plants that will work well in your landscaping, taking into account soil type, sunlight levels and the plants’ mature sizes to be sure they will thrive. Plant them properly and give them appropriate care so they stay healthy and lush.
  • Opt for faster-growing varieties if you want extra raw material to work with for seasonal decorating. This will give you more prunings to use for your holiday crafts, but don’t overprune or you risk damaging the plants and they may not recover.
  • Choose at least 1-2 plants from each category if space permits in your landscape. This will give you even more variety to work with to create stunning holiday arrangements. Alternatively, opt for plants that can do double duty, providing both foliage and berries, for example.
  • Consult with neighbors if they have plants you’d like to use; they may be happy to let you have their prunings and you can share a decorated arrangement as a gift in return. You can also visit Christmas tree lots or botanical gardens to ask about raw material that may be available for free or at a very low cost.

With proper planning for your landscape, you will ensure you have plenty of handy material for all your natural holiday decorating needs.

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Please note: Our Garden Center might not carry all items listed in the above article!

Outdoor Holiday Decorations

During the holidays we often spend a great deal of time, money and effort to decorate inside our homes, but why not continue that decorating outside? There are so many types of beautiful outdoor holiday decorations, you can make the exterior of your home just as distinctive and lovely for the season as the interior.

Containers

Large matching containers on either side of your driveway, walkway or front door make an elegant impression. Evergreen shrubs or small trees, gaily festooned with mini-lights, ornaments, bows and topped with a star are a welcoming sight for visiting friends and family. Consider holly or another plant with brightly colored winter berries. Neat and tidy camellias bloom during or soon after the holidays. The slow-growing, evergreen shrubs, Dwarf Alberta Spruce and the fragrant sarcococca will happily reside in containers for many years. Uplighting the container with solar powered lights eliminates power cord concerns and allows passersby to enjoy of your holiday décor during the evening hours.

Wreaths and Evergreen Garlands

Wreaths and garlands of fragrant greenery waft a holiday scent into the home every time the door opens. These are sold readymade as well as in bundles of greenery to make your own. Affix them to the front door, an entry banister or even draped along porch railings or entry columns for more elegance. Use bows, ornaments, seashells, fishing lures or whatever you fancy to coordinate the entry decoration with the house décor for a connected theme.

Fences and Gates

Whether you have a quaint picket fence, a rustic split-rail fence or an elegant wrought iron fence, you can decorate it. Swags of garland and greenery are quick and easy to add, and you can give them more color with strategically placed bows that not only hold up the greenery but accent it as well. Wrap a strand of lights along the garland so it will shine even in the darkness, or space out unbreakable ornaments to hang between posts. Swags of garland can also go along the top of a gate (be sure to leave an opening so the gate can be used), or opt for wreaths on the gate instead.

Driveways and Paths

Light up the lanes leading to your home by using solar-powered lights in holiday colors, or opt for themed lights to create a cheerful, whimsical holiday path. For a more elegant look, consider simple luminaries spaced regularly along an entry path, garden path, driveway or up a small staircase leading to your front door. Not only will the extra illumination be an elegant holiday look, but it can help give visitors a better view of the path to prevent slipping or tripping.

From inside to outside, have a happy holiday!

Please note: Our Garden Center might not carry all items listed in the above article!

Tools for Holiday Gift Giving

It’s easy to shop for gifts for the gardeners on our holiday list. There are always new tools available for the serious, and not so serious, gardeners in our lives. In fact, there may be too many to pick from, but we can help you narrow down the selection to find the perfect gift.

  • Pruners
    Every gardener faces the need to prune or deadhead flowers at some time. From hand pruning a wayward twig to removing a branch 10′ overhead, there is a pruning tool to make any job easier.Because everyone’s hands and hand strengths are different (and some folks are left-handed), hand pruners are the most personal of garden tools. Two well-known companies, Corona and Felco, produce hand pruners and saws. Hand pruners come in two basic styles: by-pass pruners have two sharp blades that pass each other when cutting, while anvil pruners have one sharp blade cutting the material against the other flat blade. Both companies offer several models of these styles to accommodate different pruning needs, sizes of hands, hand strengths and orientations. New ergonomic models optimize hand strength and minimize discomfort.Another option is a pruning saw, which is different from any old saw. A larger sheath model saw makes short work of removing a large branch. A smaller fold-up model is great to have in a gardener’s pocket while making the daily rounds. Different models, with different lengths and teeth sizes, ease sawing effort. Check out our gift shop to see all the options.

    When an overhead branch requires removal, a gardener appreciates a pole pruner. Not only is it a hassle to get out the ladder, it’s dangerous to perform the sawing and pruning motions when balancing. The redesigned Fiskars pole pruners are powerful, with a telescoping pole to 12′ extension. If the branch is too large for the pruner, the detachable saw blade cuts through it. Unlike the old style pole pruners, there are no ropes to pull (and tangle in the tree!). Pruning heads even swivel to get a closer and cleaner cut. The Fiskars pole pruner, or Pruning Stik®, won’t fit in your gardener’s stocking, but it’s certain to be a winner!

  • Shovels and Spades
    Shovels and spades are other key gardening tools. While many shovel versions exist, the round point shovel is the most common. The heavy-duty blade point pushes through the soil and the rounded blade scoops the soil. Square-edged shovels also scoop soil and other materials in addition to digging but don’t have the point. Spades, basically a smaller version of a shovel, are usually flatter. Most shovels have a rolled lip, or rim, on the top of the blade. This is where the user puts their foot to push the tool into the soil. The larger the rim, the more comfortable for the foot when doing a lot of digging.Better quality shovels and spades are powder coated to prevent rust, are pre-sharpened, and the blade is welded or forged to the shaft. Shafts vary in style and material. Wood, plastic or fiberglass shafts may be straight or end with a handle. A fiberglass shaft lasts longer than wooden shafts and doesn’t require annual maintenance and cleaning. Ergonomic designs reduce the chance of wrist injury. Other shovel/spade specialties include the trenching shovels to dig deeper than the standard 12 inches, border spades and smaller sized round point shovels to dig smaller holes or working around existing landscape. And don’t forget trowels and other hand digging tools. If your gardener has a special digging or scooping need, there’s a shovel or spade for it.
  • Hoes
    Hoes may seem old-fashioned, but there are new designs every gardener can appreciate. Used since ancient times, the hoe performs many functions in the garden depending upon its configuration. The regular hoe’s rectangular shaped blade, positioned at a right angle to the shaft, weeds and shallowly cultivates. The V-shaped version, also called the Warren hoe, has a point to dig furrows for seed planting. The other side closes the furrows after planting. The “weeding” and “action” style hoes make short work of removing weeds.
  • Rakes
    A rake is another essential tool. Think of a leaf rake as a large hand – it allows the user to gather a large amount of material such as leaves and debris. Rakes may be metal or plastic, quite large to cover a large area quickly or quite small to get under plants without damage. Rakes are practical and save time and energy. Specialized rakes include the two styles of garden rakes, flat and bow, and thatch rakes to remove thatch from lawns to keep turf lush and thick.

There’s just one problem with giving these larger tools as gifts – they’re very difficult to wrap!

Please note: Our Garden Center might not carry all items listed in the above article!

Outdoor Ornamentation

Do you miss the vibrancy of your flowerbeds and the rich, lush colors of your landscape once winter sets in? With warm weather pots, window boxes and hanging baskets already in place, decorating the outside of your house this winter will be a cinch!

  1. Use only containers that are winter safe. Porous pots, like terra cotta, are not a good choice as they tend to crack when they freeze. Better choices include cast iron or aluminum urns, fiberglass or foam containers and cocoa-lined wire hanging baskets and troughs. For a truly holiday look, consider containers that may have red-and-green coloration or other holiday hues, or look for whimsical holiday-themed designs.
  2. Use the soil that is already in your containers. Remove just the tops from your previous plantings, allowing their roots to remain in the soil as an anchor for your winter arrangement. OASIS Floral foam is another good choice that works well for smaller outdoor arrangements like those in hanging baskets. You may also need some plant or gardening pins to help keep your arrangement in place and secure.
  3. Begin by adding greens to your container (note: your greens will last longer if soaked in Wilt-Pruf for 24 hours before using). Cut branches to the desired length and remove all green needles from the portion that will be inserted into the soil. Create a dense base for your arrangement using either white pine or spruce. Consider allowing some boughs to trail over the edge of the arrangement for more visual interest, or mix up different types of greens for interesting texture.
  4. Create a focal point for your arrangement with the addition of a few tall branches of curly willow, Harry Lauder’s Walking Stick, red twig dogwood or white painted birch. Position these taller elements near the back of the arrangement to allow more room for additional plants and decorative items. To add more magic to the arrangement, consider painting taller branches gold or silver.
  5. To include additional color and texture, incorporate more winter-themed plants into the arrangement. Magnolia leaves, holly, incense cedar, winterberry, China berry, pepper berry, protea, eucalyptus or other decorative branches and berries are all top choices. Go for a lush, tiered look for the best effect.
  6. To bring your arrangement to life add mini white or colored lights, desired ornaments and weather-proof ribbon. For a more whimsical look, consider garlands, candy canes, cranberry strings or even a fairy gingerbread house. Remove these when the holiday season ends and leave the arrangement intact until time for spring planting.
  7. You might spruce up around the pot to bring even more notice to your arrangement. Consider a ribbon around the pot, or add light-up gift boxes or wrapped boxes around the pot to create a larger focus.

With just a few steps, the outdoor containers you enjoy in spring, summer and fall can continue to be lovely accents for holiday and winter decoration.

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Please note: Our Garden Center might not carry all items listed in the above article!

Decorating for the Holidays

Whether your prefer a single candle in each window or a 12-foot tree covered with glittering decorations, our ideas will help you create a special home, from the simple to the dramatic! Try some new and stunning decorations this holiday season, including…

  • Garlands and Swags
    Graceful drapes of greeneries and ribbons are the perfect choice for mantles, doorways, arches and railings. Weave two coordinating ribbons around a swag for a stunning contrast, or attach cones, berries or dried or silk flowers with a dab of hot glue for a colorful burst. You might also weave a bead strand into a garland or swag for extra glamour.
  • Wreaths
    Classic wreaths can be stunning on doors, over mantles or on windows. They can be completed with a single bow or festooned with berries, trumpets or other decorations to match your décor. Whimsical wreaths may be made of candy or faux cookies, or you might tuck small gift boxes or other accents into the design.
  • Fresh Cut Greens
    Pine boughs and holly sprigs look and smell great, whether they are scattered on the mantle, tucked behind pictures or brimming from vases and baskets. Tie a bunch together with a big bow for a delightful, simple door decoration. When using in a vase, make a fresh cut at the base of greens before arranging and check the water often the first few days to keep them plump and fragrant.
  • Roping
    Simple ropes of pine, laurel, boxwood and princess pine look great along a fence, railing or light post. Add large, bold bows along the railing or fence with even larger bows at the base of the gateposts for an easy decoration and to bring the look together.
  • Ornaments
    Ornaments don’t just belong on trees anymore! Fill a tall, clear vase or glass pillar with colorful ornaments to display them elegantly, no tree required. For a more elegant look, use ornaments of just 1-2 colors, or ornaments only in coordinating shades and similar hues. You can also display ornaments in a broad open dish, around the base of a pillar candle or worked into a wreath or swag.
  • Treats
    Your favorite holiday treats can also be elegant decorations. String candy canes along a garland or arrange them in a vase for a sweet decoration. A gingerbread house can be a beautiful centerpiece, or fragrant gingerbread cookies can be attached to a garland or swag.  You can even add a dish of bright peppermints as a candle base or ribbon candies to a wreath.

No matter what your decorating style, there are creative and unusual ways you can add festive elegance to your home to celebrate the season.

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Please note: Our Garden Center might not carry all items listed in the above article!

Create a Beautiful Tree in 6 Easy Steps

Have you ever wondered how to create that beautiful Christmas tree, the kind featured in photo shoots and magazines? Whether you opt for a live potted tree, a fresh cut pine or an artificial tree you can reuse for several years, the steps to a stunning, artistic tree are the same, and you don’t have to be an interior designer to create a lovely Christmas tree. 

  1. Color
    Pick a theme color or color pair. This may be colors you simply like together, or you could mimic school colors, a favorite sports team or classic holiday pairings like burgundy and gold or blue and silver. Consider your tree theme and choose colors accordingly, such as blue and aqua for a tropical, undersea tree, or white and silver for a winter wonderland tree.
  2. Lights
    Use one strand of 70 to 100 lights for each foot of tree (7 strands for a 7-foot tree). This will be the approximate ratio on a pre-lit artificial tree, or you will need to add lights to a live tree. Spread the strands out evenly, and tuck wires into the tree so they are less visible. White lights or a single color are generally more elegant than multi-colored strands.
  3. Ribbon
    Plan on 40 to 60 yards of ribbon unless the tree is in a corner. The treetop will typically take 10-15 yards of this amount. You can also mix two ribbons for a nice effect, too. Wire-edged ribbon is easier to shape into graceful curves, and a broad ribbon will make a more dramatic impact, particularly on a larger tree. Drape the trailing edges of ribbon down the sides of the tree, either straight toward the ground or in a graceful spiral.
  4. Accents
    Add silk or dried flowers as your next step along with garland. Make sure flowers are placed at different depths within the tree so there is dimension. Holiday flowers such as poinsettias are most popular, but you can opt for different blooms to coordinate with your theme, such as roses for a Victorian tree or tropical flowers for a festive beach-themed tree.
  5. Balls
    Use 6-8 boxes of plain glass ball ornaments, either all the same color or 3-4 boxes each of two coordinating colors. Tuck some of these ornaments deeper within the tree to reflect more light and add depth to your decorating. A medium-size ornament is appropriate, or choose balls of different sizes but in the same plain color and basic shape.
  6. Ornaments
    Add themed ornaments last for that finishing touch and to give your tree some whimsy and pizzazz, but try not to go overboard with quirkiness. If you prefer a simpler, more elegant look, avoid overly themed ornaments but choose simple colored ornaments in different shapes that match your overall color plan, such as using drip, icicle, or star-shaped ornaments to complete the tree.

Voila! You have a Christmas tree that will bring beauty and elegance to your holiday decorating all season long.

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Please note: Our Garden Center might not carry all items listed in the above article!

Tips for a Gardening Gift Basket

A gift basket is a great present for any gardener in your life, and is easy to customize to any gardening preferences. With just one trip to the garden center, you can create the perfect gardening gift basket for any special occasion.

When to Give a Gardening Gift Basket

A gift basket can be a wonderful choice for any special occasion, including birthdays, anniversaries or holidays. A gardening gift basket is especially thoughtful for someone who is interested in starting gardening as a new hobby, perhaps after retirement or buying a new home where they finally have gardening space. Anyone starting a clean eating or clean living lifestyle may also appreciate getting started gardening so they can better control their own food sources.

Creating the Very Best Gardening Gift Basket

There are many great ways to vary a gift basket to match the recipient’s gardening preferences exactly. Being flexible also allows for creativity in assembling the basket and making it a fun, enjoyable gift. To create a practical, customized gardening gift basket, it is important to consider all the necessary parts, including…

  • Basket
    A wicker or woven basket is the traditional choice for building a gift basket, but when you’re making a gardening basket, you can think of more creative containers instead. For a small basket, consider using a galvanized bucket, watering can, bird bath, window box or other creative option. Larger gift baskets can start with a large planting pot or similar container, or even something as practical as a wheelbarrow.
  • Base
    Filling the bottom of a basket provides a sturdy base to support gifts, as well as to be sure the basket does not tip over when it is filled. For a gardening gift basket, good options for a firm base include a bag of potting soil or fertilizer, mulch, peat moss or other gardening goodies. A bag of birdseed or river rock can also be an exceptional base. Even a large hose can help fill the bottom of a container and will be another great gift.
  • Gifts
    The bulk of the basket should be the different gifts that match the recipient’s gardening dreams. For a flower gardener, for example, that may include bulbs and seedlings of their favorite blooms, as well as flower pruning shears and other hand tools. A vegetable garden gift basket, on the other hand, would have different veggie seedlings, plant identifiers and perhaps some long-handled tools for working in the garden. A bee house can be a great addition for any type of garden to encourage more pollinators, and a garden hat, new gloves and how-to books are all good choices for any gardening-themed gift basket. Of course, a gift card will always make a perfect addition to any gift basket allowing the recipient to make a few choices of their own.
  • Decadent Extras
    To make a gift basket extra special, be sure to add some luxuriously decadent gifts. These might be purely decorative items or artisanal extras, and can really add character and thoughtfulness to your gift basket. Wind chimes, welcome flags and gnomes or other whimsical pieces are great options, or choose items such as candles, soap, lotion bars, honey or other treats available from local artisans.
  • Fillers
    A good gift basket will be lush and full of fun gifts, and you can easily fill in small bare spots in a gardening gift basket with a range of smaller, inexpensive gifts. Packets of seeds, vine ties, plant food, pot casters, or even a hose nozzle are just a few fun options that can really fill out a gardening gift basket. For colorful fillers, consider adding potted flowers or floral starts for blooms to serve as bows.

Finishing Touches

Once your basket is filled, it’s time to make it look more like a celebratory gift. Choose a card to include as a greeting, and wrap the lip of the basket with ribbon, twine or raffia to draw the gift together. Smaller baskets may even be entirely wrapped with cellophane or tissue so they can be opened for a fun surprise. Burlap can be another option for a rustic but still practical covering or wrap that can be used in the garden to cover delicate plants after the gift is opened.

A gardening gift basket can be an amazing way to celebrate any special occasion or friendship. By choosing gifts carefully and coordinating the basket to the recipient’s gardening wishes, the gift is sure to be a wonderful surprise that is happily appreciated every time the recipient steps into their garden.

Please note: Our Garden Center might not carry all items listed in the above article!

All About Amaryllis

A bold, flowering bulb, amaryllis is popular for its winter blooming habit and makes a colorful indoor plant as well as a great gift for anyone with a green thumb. But how much do you really know about these familiar flowers?

What Is Amaryllis?

These plants are part of the flowering bulb genus Hippeastrum, which is native to South America, Central America, Mexico and the Caribbean in tropical and subtropical regions. It must be noted that the familiar amaryllis can easily be confused with the genus Amaryllis, which is actually native to southern Africa and is most successful only when grown outdoors. Hippeastrum flowers, on the other hand, thrive indoors and are widely sold as gifts and houseplants in the winter months.

Hippeastrum bulbs range from 2-5 inches in diameter and are relatively fleshy. Each bulb will produce several spear-like, stiff leaves that can reach 12-20 inches long. Along with the foliage, each bulb can produce 1-2 long stems that will yield 2-12 trumpet-shaped flowers with large, triangular petals. The bloom colors range from white, red, orange, salmon, pink and peach to deeper hues of burgundy and purple. Variegated and striped blooms are also popular.

Blooms may last for several weeks, and the foliage can persist long after the blooms die.

Potting and Caring for Amaryllis

Unpotted, dormant bulbs should be stored in a cool (55 degrees Fahrenheit), dark, dry location. Before planting, the bulbs should be brought to room temperature, and the roots can be lightly rehydrated in lukewarm water for an hour or two before planting, but the base of the bulb itself should be kept dry to minimize the risk of rot. While these bulbs will bloom in water – they’re often sold in clear, decorative vases with the roots reaching into water and pebbles used as a planting medium – they will do better when properly planted, which will also encourage reblooming.

The best pot for a single amaryllis bulb will be just an inch wider than the bulb’s diameter, or several bulbs can be planted together in a larger pot for a more dramatic display. Because these flowers grow so tall, however, the pot should be heavy enough to support their size. If necessary, adding several rocks or a layer of gravel to the bottom of the pot before planting will help balance the weight to keep the arrangement stable, and a deeper pot will also provide adequate room for root growth. It may also be necessary to add a stake to support the tall flower stems, but be sure not to damage the bulb when adding a stake to the pot.

Rich potting soil is essential for the best amaryllis blooms, as these bulbs grow vigorously and require adequate nutrition to reach their full potential. When planting a bulb, it should be submerged in the soil up to its neck, but leaving the top quarter of the bulb uncovered. The soil should be tamped firmly to support the bulb. Place the pot in a warm, sunny spot when foliage emerges, and rotate the pot daily as the plant grows taller to ensure straight, upright growth that will better support heavy flowers.

Gently water the bulb until the first stems appear, but take care not to overwater the pot or the bulb and roots may rot. As the plant grows taller and the blooms emerge, more watering will be needed to keep it adequately moisturized.

It may take 7-12 weeks for an amaryllis to bloom, depending on the type and size of bulb, its growing conditions and the care it receives. Larger bulbs that produce more flowers will generally take longer to bloom, while smaller bulbs will have shorter flowers but will bloom more quickly.

After the Bloom

Because these plants are popular every holiday season, many people discard amaryllis bulbs after they have stopped blooming. It is possible, however, to encourage reblooming with the proper care.

After the flowers have faded, deadhead the blooms but leave the foliage intact. Sharp flower-pruning shears are best to avoid tearing the stem or causing it to bend or break. Your Amaryllis should be placed in the sunniest spot available, continue to water as necessary and monthly feeding should ensue. This will encourage leaf production which with photosynthesize adding nourishment to the bulb enabling it to produce flowers again next winter. Move the plant outside once all danger of frost has passed to a sunny location. Continue to water and begin fertilizing every other week.

If you want to control when your amaryllis blooms again, you will need to encourage the bulb to go dormant. This is done by stopping fertilization, allowing the soil to gradually dry out, and reducing sunlight and temperature so leaf production slows and eventually stops. The dormant period will generally last 8-10 weeks, so, if you would like your Amaryllis to bloom for Christmas, mid-August is the time to begin this process. When leaves brown naturally, cut them back, remove the bulb from the dry soil, wrap it in newspaper and store it at around 55 degrees Fahrenheit for 8 to 10 weeks. After this dormant period, repot the bulb in fresh soil and begin watering again. The bulb will start to produce leaves and flowers won’t be far behind. With the proper conditions and care, you can keep your amaryllis blooming for years to come.

Amaryllis flowers are attractive and bold, perfect for brightening any indoor landscape during a cold and dreary winter. By understanding these flowers and their needs, you can provide them with proper care to ensure they always look their best.

Please note: Our Garden Center might not carry all items listed in the above article!

Holiday Gardener’s Calendar

Winter is upon us. Depending upon the temperatures, there may still be time to finish remaining chores. If you have any questions about the following procedures or products, please come in and see us. We can help you select the correct dormant oil, fertilizer, selective herbicide and frost protection method. We’re always here to help.

General Landscape

  • Mulch with bark, compost or other local materials to enrich soil, protect plant roots and prevent erosion.
  • Protect plants from frost and wind.

Houseplants

  • Perk up tired houseplants by removing dead and dying leaves. Wash under a soft shower in the sink or tub.
  • Spider mites proliferate in warm dry winter homes. Check for mites by looking for tiny speckles on leaves.
  • Transplant if roots are growing through the drainage holes or over the pot edge. If you don’t want to move into a larger pot, untangle the roots and cut back by 1/3, scour the pots and replant with new soil.
  • Remember to turn your plants each week as they begin to grow towards the weaker window light.
  • For indoor bloom, plant amaryllis, paper white narcissus, hyacinth, crocus and indoor cyclamen.
  • Popular holiday plants such as poinsettias, chrysanthemums and orchids fill the stores. Check them thoroughly for “hitchhikers” before bringing into the home or spray with household plant insecticide or soap.
  • Be creative in your arrangements and combine them with metallic painted twigs, pinecones or seashells.
  • If using a live tree for a “living Christmas tree”, prolong its time indoors by using Wilt-Pruf to reduce the loss of moisture from the needles.

Lawn:

  • Remove leaves, toys, hoses, etc, from lawns to prevent dead spots.
  • Apply winter fertilizer, if not already done. The middle number, phosphorus, aids root growth during the winter.
  • If you have weeds in your lawn, consider using a winter fertilizer with weed control.
  • Mow one time after lawn goes dormant and before freezing. This last mowing should be 2 ½” tall.
  • When temps are freezing, stay off the lawn as much as possible to reduce blade breakage.

Vegetables:

  • Protect cool season vegetables with row covers, leaf or mulch cover.
  • Mulch beds to enrich and protect from rain/snow erosion.
  • Review gardening notes and plan next year’s garden.
  • Test germination rate of leftover seeds, if wanting to use again.
  • If gardening under lights or in heated greenhouse, start seeds of early spring crops: lettuce, kale, mustard, spinach, and other greens.
  • Harvest carrots, lettuce, greens and over-wintering crops.

Trees and Shrubs

  • Stake young trees and vines if needed. In case of a heavy freeze, use Wilt-Pruf or similar product to reduce transpiration of moisture.
  • Prevent southeast trunk injury, a form of winter freeze damage. Use light-colored tree guards to protect the trunks of young trees for at least two years after planting. After two years, paint the trunks with white latex paint. These two methods prevent the tree trunk from splitting when sunlight warms the bark on side of the trunk.
  • Fertilize shrubs and trees, if not done already, and the ground is not frozen. This allows roots to absorb when temperatures are above 40⁰ and when spring returns. Granules and spikes provide nutrients effectively and easily.
  • Prune out dead and diseased tree branches to prevent from falling on roof or pedestrians.

Please note: Our Garden Center might not carry all items listed in the above article!